Why MPs are struggling to find their voices

MPs are struggling to maintain their dignity and standing, according to MPs’ letters to the Guardian. But as The Independent point out, we shouldn’t be too worried. With this month’s general election, it seems…

Why MPs are struggling to find their voices

MPs are struggling to maintain their dignity and standing, according to MPs’ letters to the Guardian. But as The Independent point out, we shouldn’t be too worried. With this month’s general election, it seems there’s no more time for negative headlines, and although our standing has shrunk, our power still is. It’s time for MPs to remember their values, the way they conduct themselves, and how they remain relevant in this changing political world. In the face of growing polarisation, talking about politics and Parliament and other aspects of our democracy seems almost ridiculous. The mass exit of those who vote Labour and the resurgence of Ukip mean that there are fewer than half the MPs of 2003. With over three million people having not bothered to vote last year, figures like that imply that many of those who are committed to change our system of government are struggling to be heard.

However, this crisis doesn’t reflect our national political environment. The UK democracy is still good and strong. The truth is that the voice of the voice of many MPs has been lost, with the many of the more right-wing ones growing louder and bolder as their self-interest becomes clear. Parliamentary politics should be an open and honest representation of all of us. It’s essential for all of us to have the opportunity to speak with, and debate ideas with, MPs. None of us will find a solution through personal strength alone – that’s not leadership. Nor will a Tory for The Sun or a Labour for The Independent save our democracy – in fact, they’re the opposite of what we need. All of us, regardless of political affiliation, need to find our voice and stand together. Despite this, our voices don’t always get heard, with angry populist figures making waves in our politics. Their successes have undermined the delicate balance between our society’s right to disagree with each other and the means to pass our laws. Our parliament represents more than just individuals, it represents our shared responsibility to the common good. As MPs, it’s our responsibility to hold all those holding public office to account and bring our common good to the fore. That’s the parliament the founding fathers imagined – and we all believe it can be a much better one.

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