What makes the difference for a business? The talent

Written by Diane Peterson, CNN Co-founder of Taco Bell and founder of Starbucks, Howard Schultz was asked on stage how he juggles his roles. His answer: “You do them all in one role, you…

What makes the difference for a business? The talent

Written by Diane Peterson, CNN

Co-founder of Taco Bell and founder of Starbucks, Howard Schultz was asked on stage how he juggles his roles. His answer: “You do them all in one role, you get lost in it.”

Schultz’s answer strikes a chord as more and more chefs, managers and business executives have grown tired of themselves focusing on so many competing roles.

In fact, it’s a growing epidemic that can often confuse, stress and even shatter other important elements of your life.

“I think we make the mistake to see business as a me factor and business as a job,” says Christina Nance-Holt, general manager of only one of Taco Bell’s 6,800 locations. “We call it who you are, where you came from, where you are going, what you need and where we are going.

“What business is about is how are we investing in people … That’s the story I think we need to tell more,” she says.

That’s not to say that companies that are not focused on people are wrong, or even dangerous. There are certainly hurdles worth surmounting.

In recent years, a growing number of organizations that help startup or startup-like businesses get off the ground have formed. On Friday, we announced that the Flying Turtle is working with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to support the New York Botanical Garden’s Center for Urban Horticulture as part of CNN GrowHer Initiative .

That program aims to elevate women into leadership roles in agribusiness, food production and the food industry.

“I think it’s just giving us another tool to be able to talk about it. The fact that I can be on a panel with my CEO, Cathy Cohen, that we can talk about what we are doing in each and every channel … It means the world to our employees,” says Nance-Holt.

Jessica Sassan O’Neal, the CEO of Stage Door Social , notes that the fast-casual restaurant experience comes down to people.

“It comes down to people and their ability to support each other, their ability to make people happy. So to be able to invest in what they want to be investing in, and they think this will be an incredible experience for them, means a lot.

“It also brings to the table, I think, the ability to invest in the employees. And the fact that all of those people are invested in the success of Stage Door is only going to be as good as we are on the other side.”

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