Three Francophone Authors We Love: ‘Traditions of the Migrant’ Explores Central American Migrants and the Colonial Past

De Macedo Benet is a scholar at the University of Limón (UI), Costa Rica. He wrote a book, “Traditions of the Migrant: Colonial and Arab-European Influences on Human Evolution,” which investigates the relationship between…

Three Francophone Authors We Love: ‘Traditions of the Migrant’ Explores Central American Migrants and the Colonial Past

De Macedo Benet is a scholar at the University of Limón (UI), Costa Rica. He wrote a book, “Traditions of the Migrant: Colonial and Arab-European Influences on Human Evolution,” which investigates the relationship between populations on the Central American coast and historically Mediterranean migration. He is also a graduate in International Relations from the University of Florida.

Adriana Grandes is a critical theorist, social critic, and international educator. She is the founder of the influential blog “La Gran Yolanda,” which is translated into Spanish as “The Big Sleep,” the drug dealing that was pioneered by Fonseca in the early 1900s. She is a contributor to La Voz de Semanario and Semanario Universidad.

Her “Matas de Penedes,” a map of her homeland Spain, deeply unsettles the nation. She is the creator of a “posible novela” about the Spanish colonization of the region, named “Contravenida,” in which she describes men and women suffering the effects of an empire attempting to conquer them all, a world that romanticizes history as an unrealistic triumph of common sense, but is in fact an old story on a play-by-play script.

Almudena Grandes was born in August 1961 in Cádiz, the capital of Andalusia, a region of the southwest part of Spain that was historically dominated by Arabs but became part of Roman Spain after the colonizer conquered the country during the fourth century.

In a way, Grandes was born at the entry point of the pacification of the Andalusian cities, after thousands of Latinos died fighting against Francisco Franco’s rule. The author, who received her Masters in Humanities from Arizona State University, graduated with the first Spanish-language master’s degree in international relations from Macalester College. Her earlier book, “The Road,” is a novel about the emigration of immigrants and emigres from the Iberian Peninsula and Panama and the diffusion of their wealth among their descendants.

Those of us who read her books in Spanish will need to translate into English the biography because it contains inconsequential observations and statements. It can be read by those familiar with the Spanish language, but only to the extent that they appreciate the thick prose and thick, looping and fluid sentences.

Grandes traveled frequently with Fonseca and studied Arabic from 1991 to 1992. Her thesis concerns her fascination with the Arabic language and the details she gathered for the Middle East and Latin America. A reviewer for the Los Angeles Times called her book, in spite of its literary verve, “a disjointed technical treatise.”

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