My neighbours are naked and making loud noises. How do I get involved?

Last Friday night we heard a loud roaring noise in our neighbours’ property, about midnight. The next morning, we looked out the window to see a strange parade of women arriving at our neighbour’s…

My neighbours are naked and making loud noises. How do I get involved?

Last Friday night we heard a loud roaring noise in our neighbours’ property, about midnight. The next morning, we looked out the window to see a strange parade of women arriving at our neighbour’s house accompanied by two large dogs.

There were 15 to 20 of them, completely naked, lying across the sofa in the living room and in the bath. The owners of the property were nowhere to be seen. This was not the first time this has happened. We have also had to go past that house three or four times in the past year to complain, and some of us think that the behaviour is very concerning for those of us who live here.

Unfortunately, our neighbourhood council and A&E department don’t seem very good at dealing with the matter. They are known to our neighbours, but they haven’t had any engagement with either. They told us they had no knowledge of the problem – they don’t know who owns it – and told us to speak to the neighbour we call.

Because we’re just two women, no one takes us seriously. Neighbours from opposite sides of the street gossip and laugh about what’s going on. They also describe our behaviour as “rude and aggressive”.

Our neighbours know that we’re neighbours, so how can they not know who we are? Should we knock on their door and make a big fuss about it? Should we even talk to them?

I have asked my husband if we could look after them overnight, but his opinion is that it should be them who ask for help, or else try to resolve the problem themselves. My main concern is that we know nothing about what is going on with these women because our neighbours don’t get involved.

– Sadie, Salford

Sadie sounds like she’s a really brave woman. Although, as part of the “I am a woman” presentation it’s unlikely any of her neighbours, let alone fellow neighbours, will get the opportunity to meet. So, if you feel as if you need to talk to them, consider introducing yourself in the form of your house and flat number, as I’ve explained, to start an informal line of communication that can evolve into better understanding.

Whatever approach you take, take a keen interest in the progress of the conversation. It doesn’t necessarily help to try to build trust and connection on the spot – tell each other how you feel – and, as you’re neighbours, you must ask each other in a friendly and neutral manner. It’s more likely to bring out the underlying factors that led to the escalation of this behaviour in the first place.

If the issues are really alarming, you need to go through a formal process with the council and an ambulance service. They will both inform you of their investigation and your responsibilities as tenants. During that process, you may hear that your neighbours are not taking their responsibilities seriously – or may not have been informed.

If you do need to take action against a property owner, contact your local council’s housing and community safety service and your neighbour. Work out the best course of action and challenge each other’s actions as you go along.

We’d love to hear your experiences. Email [email protected] if you would like to write a letter to the editor.

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