MURDER IN THE STREETS: A Goat Rodeo Leaves Dallas on Edge

P-P-P-P-P-Rodeo. This rare mix of significant burn cases and goats was linked to a hospital Rodeo. This rare mix of significant burn cases and goats was linked to a hospital in Texas this weekend…

MURDER IN THE STREETS: A Goat Rodeo Leaves Dallas on Edge

P-P-P-P-P-Rodeo. This rare mix of significant burn cases and goats was linked to a hospital

Rodeo. This rare mix of significant burn cases and goats was linked to a hospital in Texas this weekend and has the country, which has become a more feral and wild nation, on edge.

An anonymous tip to My Dallas Morning News led to the confirmation of what likely was a human origine fire that started Saturday evening in Highland Park, Texas. In the days after, wildfires have raged through three states in the US, destroying hundreds of homes. The mystery goat herders, meanwhile, have returned to their 5,000+ head, many with ribbons, rostered for roping.

The acute USDA veterinarian Dr. Kenneth Kichler said there is no reason to believe any of the goats perished from the fire. Kichler called it a one-in-a-million case. That was a year ago.

In 2015, part of the Omicron genus, a small group of goats from Africa, was exposed to a flammable material, without human harm. The U.S. burned a lot more goats than people, but we haven’t heard what caused the fire in Highland Park, and need to know as soon as possible.

THE PROBLEM WITH ROUSING: Severe dryness from drought-stressed trees and brush.

We can almost start sympathizing with an anonymous source of calls when the person who called to authorities claims to be a retired hay buyer from back east. This may or may not be true, but the avenue is simple: any hay seller that sold hay from agriculture, purchased products or animals in the next one to five years should have a biosecurity sample of their products to send to the USDA for analysis. The HHS inspected this business that has cows, bulls and goats.

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service prohibits most livestock from being in contact with certain types of grass, including the paddy or draft horses. Similar precautionary guidelines apply to cattle and sheep.

ROUSING COMMESSE DOES NOT MEAN COWS ARE AT RISK.

It’s simply a coincidence that paddy, draft, cattle, sheep and goats could share such combustible substances. There is no reason to believe the mix was a crime because the cattle grazing on the hill behind the goat herd were screened for any contamination.

There is a second “factors in play” scenario, with the “factors” both evolving in Texas as we speak. Dryer conditions, up until recently, have been difficult to predict, and herds of hay-eating livestock are much more vulnerable than humans to fire during dry, hot, windy days.

An additional component of the dilemma is clear — hay has nowhere to go but down.

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