It’s a belated, much-needed TV week in the Writers Guild

Nosie writes for our sister site TVGuide.com and is the author of “Steal This Show: Your Guide to Clips on Television.” It’s a belated, much-needed TV week in the Writers Guild of America Local…

It’s a belated, much-needed TV week in the Writers Guild

Nosie writes for our sister site TVGuide.com and is the author of “Steal This Show: Your Guide to Clips on Television.”

It’s a belated, much-needed TV week in the Writers Guild of America Local 500, a labor strike that has threatened to stall the summer schedules since June 30.

One show that seems to have the protection of the guild’s contract for the entire duration is “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” Netflix’s brilliant comedy based on the eponymous memoir by author Ellie Kemper, starring Kemper as a woman who gets trapped for 15 years in a cult. Kimmy has now headed to the big city, and filming on season five started last week. The show has already spent some time in the market by starring Kemper’s previous TV persona, Netflix veteran Ellie Kemper (“The Office”), in its second season. She is such a good fit with Kemper as a comedic actor, he has a much deeper arc to play this time as she adapts to the city life. Kicking off season five, Kimmy finds that her dreams of becoming a “word fashion designer” will come too late for her and tries to find a new pathway in a city where “words literally don’t mean anything” anymore.

Netflix also saw a future in a recurring comic character named Pig Latin, voiced by “Golden Girls” legend Rue McClanahan. Pig Latin was meant to last through season two, but McClanahan’s death in February means that she and Kimmy’s adoptive parents (Carol Kane and Jane Krakowski) will only be seen for a couple of episodes. So if you’re looking for another character you can get into, you might want to channel a bit of McClanahan herself. Fun fact: Pig Latin is located in a housing complex named McClanahan Plaza (named for the one-time headliner and Kardashian.)

Over at the ol’ network, NBC just announced a number of original series pickups, including comedies “Abby’s” (created by “Odd Mom Out” producer Jill Kargman) and “Amazing Interventions” (from “The Office” alums Eileen Heisler and Jenny Bicks).

NBC also announced a new show called “Trial & Error” (working title), a new comedy based on the Will Thomas book “Trial & Error: Adventures in the Strange but True World of New York’s Smallest Municipal Court.” It follows the bizarre adventures of two uptight attorneys and a young assistant district attorney who travel from their uptight New York lives to a quirky upstate New York community to defend a teenager accused of the bizarre crime of chopping up a dead cat.

We’re also excited to be reunited with the talented Jermaine Fowler — most recently seen on ABC’s “Single Parents” — in a new sitcom for NBC. “Old Soul” is an autobiographical comedy set in Chicago set in the 1980s and starring Fowler, Jenny Slate, James Earl, Mark Herman and Kimberly Elise, about three self-doubting thirty-somethings who set out to create “a sitcom for people who’ve never seen a sitcom.”

Also returning this summer is two veteran series, FX’s “Atlanta” and Netflix’s “Stranger Things.”

“Atlanta” returned for its second season last week, complete with a musical guest from Migos and a “30 Minutes or Less”-style teaser.

Fans are still patiently waiting for “Stranger Things” season 3, but for now, it’s time to enjoy Netflix’s “Stranger Things” back on our TVs.

Netflix will also stream its complete back catalog of 100s of TV shows and movies, plus complete seasons of acclaimed series like “Stranger Things,” “The Crown,” “House of Cards,” “House of Cards,” “Alias Grace,” “The Americans,” “The Crown,” “Friends,” “Fresh Off the Boat,” “Better Call Saul,” “Ozark,” “Orange Is the New Black,” “Queer Eye,” “Stranger Things,” “Twin Peaks,” “Arrested Development,” “Young Sheldon,” “This Is Us,” �

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