From the archive, 16 September 1983: ‘We will always carry you in our hands’

“Come, come Jesus,” cried one of the peasants, opening his arms wide. “We have come to receive you. We can carry you in our arms: we will pray for you! Come into our houses…

From the archive, 16 September 1983: ‘We will always carry you in our hands’

“Come, come Jesus,” cried one of the peasants, opening his arms wide. “We have come to receive you. We can carry you in our arms: we will pray for you! Come into our houses to find food, and obey the bells: we will carry you in our hands. In the daytime, you can go to your doctor if you are ill: at night, give you good sleep; we will always take good care of you, and when we are tired, you will be ready to go to the temple.”

Jesus entered the village like a warning, and he spoke as softly as a caress. The kingdom of Herod came and went again, empty, lost, broken.

“I have come to give you life and health,” said Jesus, “and to leave you victorious.”

He kissed the baby in his arms, and he lifted him high in the air. “Come back to me, and I will show you the kingdom of heaven.”

“Come, then,” cried another peasant. “We shall drink the cup.”

When Jesus finally took the drink, no one touched him. Everyone was thoroughly drunk, and the drunkards screamed in praise. “Jesus, Jesus, Jesus is here!”

Everyone sang, and one of the men played the lyre. When the song was finished, Jesus smiled and looked to the ground. There he found his feet, also drunk and carried high in the air. “Come, Jesus!” cried one of the peasants, leaning over to kiss him.

When Jesus caught himself he stuttered. He knew now that he had walked into a trap and was facing his sins. “Behold!” said one of the women. “Turn the water into wine!”

And Jesus heard the people clap their hands and their feet. “Forgive me my sins,” said one man, and he washed Jesus’ feet.

“Bring the scribes and the rabbis, and do not hinder them,” said another man. “There are no power over you, and no power above you. Keep yourself safe and be weary and pass away your days quickly.”

At last Jesus stuttered again, and finally said, “The waters cannot draw me away from the temple; yet it must be straightened and cleaned in the temple, and the priests sent there to lead. I am ready to leave, and come to a new position of safety.”

And when he had left he had gone, and the temple had passed, and he had left his job and his salary and his possessions and his status.

“There is some wine here for you,” said the women as they handed out a cup of wine, “for you drank with humility and purity.”

“You have given thanks,” said one of the men. “Have faith, and come to the temple.”

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