Concern over the possibility of losing middle-of-the-road voters fuels divisions in the Democratic Party

“For sometime now the balance of power has swung in our favor,” writes Esther Phillips in THE NATION. That shift has sparked concern among older progressives and millennial liberals — not because it has…

Concern over the possibility of losing middle-of-the-road voters fuels divisions in the Democratic Party

“For sometime now the balance of power has swung in our favor,” writes Esther Phillips in THE NATION. That shift has sparked concern among older progressives and millennial liberals — not because it has been enough, but because it hasn’t been enough. Much of the Democratic Party has spent the past two decades building an improbable coalition of Hispanic voters, millennial white women, African-Americans, white evangelical Christians, gay men, feminists, pro-choice women, and other minority voters and new members of the working class. “A new political coalition has formed,” writes Phillips. The Democratic Party’s electoral victories in 2016 prove that “the biggest challenge of our time is to stop trying to mold it into a candidate-centered party,” writes Phillips. Meanwhile, more conservative elements within the party have revived calls for conservative solutions to struggles between women, ethnic minorities, young people, and single mothers. “The form the opposition takes matters — Republican resistance has been fierce,” writes Phillips.

Back to earlier versions: Long story short: Liberals like Phillips are having second thoughts about the old alliance.

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