CDC updates antiretroviral vaccine rules to protect against a potentially-deadly genetic disease

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week updated its guidelines to encourage all males between the ages of 18 and 49 to get an annual shot to ward off the…

CDC updates antiretroviral vaccine rules to protect against a potentially-deadly genetic disease

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week updated its guidelines to encourage all males between the ages of 18 and 49 to get an annual shot to ward off the potentially-deadly infection called Group A Streptococcus infection, which could develop into the deadly and serious omicron syndrome. The syndrome is caused by gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection that can leave its victims without the ability to have children.

The purpose of the CDC guidelines is to encourage men and women of any sexual persuasion to get the condoms and shots that will significantly reduce the risk of the serious genetic disease omicron syndrome, which in recent years has claimed more and more lives around the country. An Omicron spokesman told The New York Times, “One of the clearest messages from today’s report is that most people infected with gonorrhea can lead normal lives with one simple, daily shot.”

“The American people are much safer today than they were in the late 1990s,” the CDC’s Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in a statement. “The majority of patients infected with gonorrhea can lead normal lives with one simple, daily shot. We urge men and women who are sexually active to get vaccinated against gonorrhea.” The CDC’s recommendations included:

Encourage all males and females of all ages to receive an annual dose of an antibiotic called ceftriaxone;

Encourage those at higher risk to receive two doses of the antibiotic ceftriaxone;

Encourage more people to get treated for gonorrhea

Have a healthy conception if gonorrhea progresses to omicron syndrome, which requires two treatments.

“Individuals at higher risk for gonorrhea should ask their doctor about initiating two cephalosporin doses (once a year) by injection or needle-free injection that should be initiated from a daily pill as quickly as possible,” CDC officials said in a press release.

Read the full report here.

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