Atlantic hurricane seasons: path of intensities

Atlantic hurricane season begins on 16 June but all starts and ends in the Atlantic. The Saffir-Simpson scale which measures hurricane intensity has moved from the tropics to its equatorial and sub-tropical states. Below…

Atlantic hurricane seasons: path of intensities

Atlantic hurricane season begins on 16 June but all starts and ends in the Atlantic.

The Saffir-Simpson scale which measures hurricane intensity has moved from the tropics to its equatorial and sub-tropical states.

Below we look at the seasonal records for all Atlantic hurricanes and their intensity over each season since records began around 1850.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially runs from 1 June to 31 November.

The above data is for Category 1 hurricanes – a category 1 can be devastating, and below is a peak intensity for the season, the Saffir-Simpson ranking.

Although there have been many more storms reaching Category 4 and 5 intensity in more tropical parts of the Atlantic Ocean than during the “pre-tropical” era before 1900, the highest peak intensity for any season still came from 1928. The then record of 105 hurricanes was set during the height of the Spanish-American War.

During the five-month storm season hurricanes can form anywhere in the Atlantic.

The Atlantic Ocean is the driest of the world’s major oceans, and the cold-water water depths where storms grow need some warmth to thrive.

The area around the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico (the eastern tropical Atlantic) has warmed rapidly in recent decades.

During the past 150 years a warmer and drier tropical Atlantic Ocean has coincided with a more active hurricane season.

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